Local Time
4:58 am MST

Icefields Parkway Region Glaciers

• A WorldWeb.com Travel Guide to Glaciers in Icefields Parkway Region, Alberta.
BulletWapta Icefield
Save
The Wapta Icefield is an area that straddles the Continental Divide, and is a source of several glaciers including the Peyto Glacier in Alberta and the Yoho Glacier in British Columbia. The icefield roughly covers 80 sq km (31 sq mi), and is a heavily studied area.
BulletMons Icefield
Save
Connected to the Lyell Icefield, the Mons Icefield is located just inside the Alberta border. The icefield area provides ski mountaineering and backcountry exploration.
BulletCrowfoot Glacier
Save
This is one of more than 100 glaciers that can be seen along the Icefields Parkway. Years ago, this glacier resembled a crow's foot, with three large toe-like extensions. The lower "toe" of this foot has since receded so much that only two toes remain. The Crowfoot Glacier is located 197 km (123 mi) south of Jasper and 33 km (20.6 mi) north of Lake Louise.
BulletKitchener Glacier
Save
This glacier is visible from the Icefields Parkway, and is part of the Columbia Icefield. It entirely covers Mount Kitchenerís summit.
BulletWaputik Icefield
Save
Encompassing about 40 sq km (15 sq mi), this icefield is located on the Continental Divide between Banff and Yoho National Parks. Its melt waters feed several lakes and rivers including the Bow River on the eastern slope and the Kicking Horse River on the west.
BulletCastleguard Glacier
Save
This glacier is one of the major glaciers of the Columbia Icefield. It is located on Castleguard Mountain, along the eastern face.
BulletSaskatchewan Glacier
Save
The largest glacier on the Columbia Icefield, the Saskatchewan Glacier is roughly 13 km (8 mi) long and covers an area of 30 sq km (11.5 sq mi). Visitors may get up-close to this glacier via snowcoach tours, which allow patrons to walk on this ancient slab of ice. The glacier varies in depth from 90 m (295 ft) to 300 m (984 ft).
BulletVulture Glacier
Save
Located just northwest of Lake Louise, this glacier is visible from the Icefields Parkway. It is part of the Wapta Icefield, which is located on the Continental Divide. The glacier is also a site for backcountry skiing.
BulletFreshfield Icefield
Save
Only accessible by a helicopter ride and challenging back country trekking, the Freshfield Icefield is a large icefield that straddles the BC and Alberta border. It, along with Mount Freshfield, were named after a president of the London Alpine Club. Ski mountaineering is possible in this area.
BulletVictoria Glacier
Save
Visible as the magnificent backdrop of Lake Louise, Victoria Glacier can be seen sitting at the base of Mt Victoria. Melt water from the Victoria Glacier feeds the famous Lake Louise.
BulletHector Glacier
Save
Found on the north slope of Mount Hector, this glacier extends northward for 3 km (1.9 mi). In the summer of 1938, a large part of this glacier cracked, 60 m (197 ft) thick, off and slid into the Molar Creek valley, destroying everything in its wake, causing hazardous conditions in the area.
BulletWilson Icefield
Save
This small icefield is located just off Highway 93, along the Icefields Parkway. Various helicopter tours are available to this icefield.
BulletStutfield Glacier
Save
From this point, view the Sunwapta River, an excellent example of a braided river. The valley bottom is filled with sand and gravel spreading the river across the valley floor in interlacing channels. The Stutfield Glacier features a picturesque pair of ice falls which spill down the face of Mount Stutfield. Located 95 km (59.3 mi) south of Jasper and 135 km (84.3 mi) north of Lake Louise.
BulletPeyto Glacier
Save
Part of the Wapta Icefield, this glacierís meltwaters feed the turquoise-coloured Peyto Lake. The glacier is a two to three hour hike from the Peyto Lookout just off the Trans-Canada Highway.
BulletAndromeda Glacier
Save
Part of the Columbia Icefield, the Andromeda Glacier was once one with the Athabasca Glacier. This sheet of ancient ice has now melted considerably that it rests far above the Athabasca.
BulletAthabasca Glacier
Save
Part of the Columbia Icefield, the Athabasca Glacier is the most accessible and therefore most visited glacier in North America. This 6 km (4 mi) long slab of ice is found right across the Columbia Icefield Visitors' Centre where many icefield tours depart from. The Athabasca Glacier is made up of ancient ice that slowly moves down and melts creating water for three rivers in Alberta that eventually drain into the Pacific, Arctic, and Atlantic Oceans.
BulletColumbia Icefield
More Details Map Save
Stretching 325 sq km (125 sq mi) across the Continental Divide, this extensive field of ice features six major glaciers and reaches an estimated depth of 365 m (1,299 ft). The Columbia Icefield feeds the Columbia, Mackenzie and Saskatchewan rivers, and its meltwaters flow into the Pacific, Arctic and Atlantic oceans. It is one of only two hydrological apexes in the world that feeds three oceans. Tours, including icewalks, are available from spring through fall.
BulletAngel Glacier
Save
Angel Glacier, with its long wings spreading horizontally, is located on the northeastern slope of Mount Edith Cavell. The glacier has formed a small lake at its base known as Cavell Pond.
BulletBow Glacier
Save
Flowing from the Wapta Icefield and visible from the Icefields Parkway, this glacier supplies melt water for Bow Lake and the Bow River. Now heavily receded, the glacier was first visited in 1987 when the ice reached the base of the mountain.
BulletDome Glacier
Save
Visible from the Icefields Parkway, this glacier descends from Snow Dome Mountain, whose summit is entirely covered by the Columbia Icefield. The glacier is about 30 m (98 ft) thick.

Business Owners/Managers
Do you manage a business in Icefields Parkway Region? If so, please search our tourism directory to ensure your company information is up to date and accurate. If you don't find a listing, we invite you to add a complimentary listing.

Add A Business Listing

If you want to increase your exposure to the millions of people who come to WorldWeb.com each month to plan their trips and vacations, please refer to our advertising information.